David B. Beckwith

Author of "The Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes"
"The Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes Volume II"

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    David was born in the Lake District of Cumbria, in the United Kingdom.
In 1969  his parents emigrated to Perth, Western Australia, taking David
and
his two younger brothers with them. After two years in High School
he then
studied Mathematics and Philosophy at the University of W.A.,
it was there that
he started dabbling with computers. He is now a retired
I.T.  Professional
(Operating Systems  and Databases). He is multi-lingual
(speaking English,
French, German, and Spanish), a polymath, a keen cook,
a painter, a gardener,
 a  lexicographer (but not  of the Times
of London calibre), and an avid traveler
(having circumnavigated the
globe, visited Antarctica, and spent more than
six months in Central and
South America. As a musician he is also an
accomplished  composer and
player (recorder, French horn, clarinet, organ,
and autoharp), but more
recently his expertise is with the CD player!

He lives on a two and a quarter hectare (nearly five and a half acres)
property in a rural region bordering onto the metropolitan area of Perth.

Here he and his wife Antoinette grow vegetables, tend an orchard of more
than two
dozen fruit and nut trees, and they raise chickens for eggs. 


Brilliantly coloured parrots (Redcaps and Ringnecks: a pestilence to the
fruit trees) and rabbit-sized marsupials (Quendas, perhaps better known
by their European given name of Bandicoot) visit them daily. In the
southern spring vibrantly iridescent blue wrens abound.

David makes cheeses, fruit and grape wines, sausages, and paints when
 he
is not writing Sherlock Holmes stories on one of his three Linux
computers. The rich and famous company in Redmond has had
nothing
to do with the creation of these stories: LibreOffice on LINUX was used.

David started writing in
2009 with the story of  the
  "Scotched, Soused, and Strung Scotsman" after
being put under
considerable pressure to write a story by two old school
friends, Christopher
and David. The other David has since published two
short stories of Sherlock
Holmes that are humourous and ex-canonical,
whereas David's collections 
are as strictly canonical as can be (given
that Conan Doyle made many serious
errors in his chronology).
When halfway through writing the 'Scotsman', David
created a 'chronology'
to fit together all of the published Conan Doyle tales.
This includes a
credible pseudo-history commencing in 1810 with the birth of
Holmes's father,
the lives of Holmes and Watson before their fateful meeting
in 1881, Watson's
two marriages, and through to (and beyond) Holmes
 supposed 'retirement' in
1903. This 'history' has been revised repeatedly
over the years, it is included
in Volume II.

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These are the tales that Dr. Watson wrote, but he never published.
Watson's great-great-grandson James Innes Watson has inherited all
of his forebear's manuscripts.  The reasons why Dr. Watson did
not publish some of his works are varied, but largely because they are
controversial, but now after more than a hundred years James Watson now
deems that they can be made public: not least that they involve the royalty
of Europe from the Victorian and Edwardian eras, the British Police
Special Branch, the fledgling British Secret Service, and the original
Mafia of New York ("the Black Hand").

  The tales also reveal much that readers could not previously know of the
great detective and his chronicler.



___________________________________________________________________________________________



VOLUME I - Contents

(Now in second edition)

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1. The Case of the Scotched, Soused, & Strung Scotsman
Holmes and Watson travel to Scotland to solve a locked room
mystery involving Freemasons.

2. Dr Watson & the Cartomancer
In which Dr. Watson tries to act as a detective alone with his
literary agent Dr. Conan Doyle.
Holmes resolves the mystery at the end.

3. The Colonial Conspiracy
A case that shows Watson's background in Australia.  The politics
involved forced Watson not to publish.

4. "Bertie"
A tale of King Edward VII.  It could never have been more true,
and thus could never be printed until now.

5. Sherlock Holmes and Jack the Ripper
Sherlock Holmes meets the Ripper.  A fictional solution to the
unsolved crimes, involving a fictional member of the Royal Family.


    baker-st


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 VOLUME II - Contents



 
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1. The Murdered Professor of Newton
Relates to the first times at 221B Baker Street, then Holmes
and Watson go to
Cambridge to another locked room mystery.

2. The Vault
In which Dr. Watson reveals what he really knew about
Professor Moriarty.

3. The Assassination Plot
The true story of Holmes retirement in 1903, a continuation of
the "Bertie" story from volume I.

4. Sherlock Holmes in America
Two cases relating to Holmes activities in New York:
"Vanderbilt & the Yeggman" and
"The Dreadful Case of the Abernethys of Baltimore".

5. The Haunted Stable
Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson solve an apparent supernatural
incident in St.Albans.

6. Appendix
The Chronology of Holmes & Watson from 1810 onwards.


watsons



This page was created using "KompoZer" on Mepis Linux   Copyright 2013-2015: David B. Beckwith